Quantcast

Google
Web learnclassicalguitar.com


Beginner Guitar 1

Hush Little Baby

Beginner Guitar 1 - Hush Little Baby is the first in the sequence of the Beginner Guitar Series. So we begin our journey by covering a few of the basics of stroke-making and melody production.

Note: Have you had a look at the following pages if you're an absolute beginner? If not, do yourself a favor and go and study them BEFORE you attempt this piece as it will stand you in good stead in the long run...

Pre-Lesson Study Exercise #1: How To Hold A Guitar Properly... 


Pre-Lesson Study Exercise #2: Left Hand Technique... 


Pre-Lesson Study Exercise #3: Rest Stroke and Free Stroke... 


Pre-Lesson Study Exercise #4: Avoiding Injuries... 


Have you done that? Great! Now let's get on with the Beginner Guitar 1 lesson.

Hush Little Baby is great practice for developing the phrasing of your melody using rest stroke (Apoyando in Spanish). The numbers over the notes on the staff indicate what fingers are used by the left hand (to play the notes on the strings).

For example, you'll see above the notes on the first two bars: 0; 0; 0; 0; 1; 0; 3; 3; 3. This just means that you play open string notes (no left hand fingering used) for the first 4 notes, followed by finger 1 (index finger) on the F note on the first string, first fret, then another open string note followed by the 3rd finger of the left hand playing the next three notes on the D, 3rd string, 3rd fret.

The indications for left hand can thus be 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 a.k.a. open string, first finger, second finger, third finger, fourth finger.

The letters below the music notation i.e. "i" and "m" are indications of what the right hand fingers are used. In this case,  it means "Indice" and "medio". Let's discuss...

The tradition, if you're new to classical/Spanish guitar is to use the Spanish names for the fingers i.e.


* Pulgar (p) - Thumb of the right hand...

 

* Indice (i) - Index of the right hand...

 

* Medio (m) - Middle finger of the right hand...

 

* Annular (a) - Ring finger of the right hand...

 

In Beginner Guitar 1 - Hush Little Baby,  you only use the "i" and "m" fingers because you want to concentrate on the rest stroke. If you view the page above on "Rest Stroke and Free Stroke" you would have discovered...

Rest stroke is generally used when a particular note or phrase of notes needs to have more "oomph" or "extra weight" added to it. It is also commonly know as "apoyando", which is the traditional Spanish name for the stroke.

After the string is struck your finger follows through and comes to rest on an adjacent string e.g. If you're playing rest stroke on the 1st or "E" string your finger would come to rest on the "B" or second string after playing the note.

You generally hit the note with more force than you would play a free stroke note (see below) and the adjacent string "catches" the follow through of your finger..."

There is also a mixture of note types in Beginner Guitar 1. In fact, the note types used are:

 

* Quarter note (Crotchet)...

 

* Eighth note (Quaver)...

 

* Half note (minim)...

 

If you're unsure of music notation, don't be afraid to look up a little theory as it's not that hard, especially in this Beginner Guitar Series. Here's the link to the notation page...

http://www.learnclassicalguitar.com/music-notation.html

The notation is related to the time signature of the piece, which in this case, is 4/4. That just means that, in each bar of music,  you have 4 beats per bar to the length of Quarter notes or crotchets, or notes that make up that amount.

In the first bar,  you have a crotchet, followed by 2 quavers, then 2 more crotchets. This adds up to 4 crotchet beats per bar. In the last bar,  you have 2 crotchets followed by a minim. You can see that because the minim is worth 2 crotchets there is a total of 4 crotchet beats in the bar.

Alright, enough theory. Now go watch the video, look at the music (and/or tab if needed) and play along with me until you are able to play solo. If the video is too fast at this stage just play on your own at a slower tempo until you are able to keep pace with the video.,

Remember, it's not a race. You need to take it slowly to lay the foundations for good technique that'll stand you in good stead in the years to come...

Go here to view the Beginner Guitar 1 - Hush Little Baby for classical guitar on YouTube...

End of Beginner Guitar 1

Well, that's it for Beginner Guitar 1. The next lesson is... 

Lesson #2 - Ode to Joy by Beethoven.

New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.

Welcome!

A Bit About Me...

Welcome to LCG! I'm Trevor Maurice, owner of this site. I hope you find inspiration in these pages to help you with  your journey of learning to play the classical guitar. You can read more of my story here...

Classical Guitar
Blog Posts

Sons de Carrillhoes, performed by Samantha C. Wells...

http://ow.ly/FjYE302IK14

* J.S. BACH, Sarabande BWV 995, Viktor VAN NIEKERK, 10-String Guitar, classical guitar...

http://ow.ly/s7yq302x2W6

 * Robert de Visee - Petit Menuet (8 string guitar)...

http://ow.ly/gXxr302izIi

Manuel Ponce - Scherzino Mexicano...

 http://ow.ly/Hhz43026ZlZ

Segovia plays Bach's Chaconne (Read along)...

http://ow.ly/ZP953026ZW8

Features

  • Classical Guitar Lessons
  • Beginner Classical Guitar Lessons
  • Classical Guitarists Bio's
  • Classical Guitar Composer Bio's
  • Classical Guitar Technique Instruction
  • Classical Guitar History Timeline
  • Tablature for Classical Guitar