Back to Back Issues Page
Great Guitar Tips, Issue #027
March 18, 2006
Hi,

Here's your latest issue of...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Great Guitar Tips - The World's Most Useable Guitar E-Zine ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ A free, monthly E-Zine dedicated to providing you with useful information and tips for your guitar playing ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ January 2006 Issue #027 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you like this E-Zine, please do a friend a big favor and pass it on. If a friend DID forward this to you and if you like what you read, please subscribe by visiting...

http://www.learnclassicalguitar.com/ezine.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Table Of Contents

1. News

2. Miguel Llobet

3. Enjoying Other Styles Of Guitar

4. New Page - Concierto De Aranjuez

5. Recommended Resource

6. This Month's Fr/ee Music

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



1. News

Hi to all new and old subscribers!

Welcome to the March 2006 issue of Great Guitar Tips.

I've got some good info on Miguel Llobet in this issue plus a new page about the Concierto De Aranjuez. See below for details.

I hope you enjoy this month's newsletter. So let's go...

2. Miguel Llobet

Miguel Llobet was born in Barcelona and died at the reasonably young age of 60. Even though he died young, Llobet's influence is still quite prominent today mainly through his transcriptions. Many people don't realize that he was a great virtuoso of the guitar and wrote music of a very high standard... At one stage he even taught the maestro Segovia himself, although this fact is often disputed. Whatever the truth, I'm sure he did have some influence on the young Segovia.

Llobet was even a talented painter and played the violin and piano as well. He moved in highly artistic circles including Debussy, Richard Strauss and the famous classical guitarist Francisco Tarrega. He was, in fact, one of Tarrega's star pupils. Llobet gave many successful concerts both in his native Spain and throughout Europe and South America. He even performed before Spanish royalty in Madrid in 1903. He is also remembered for making the first recordings for classical guitar between the years 1925-30.

Llobet died in 1938 officially of pleurisy but some say he was devastated by the siege of Barcelona in the civil war. Whatever the reason for his early death, the classical guitar world was robbed of a great talent who could have given so much more to guitar lovers everywhere. More's the pity.

3. Enjoying Other Styles Of Guitar

I'm often challenged by my students about the importance of proper technique when playing classical guitar. I always answer that it is most important to have good technique in order to produce the quality of sound that the music demands.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not against students playing different styles of music. I like to "dabble" in a little jazz and enjoy a little AC/DC from time to time but I make sure that my technique is not compromised for my classical playing.

There's no crime in playing other music for your own enjoyment and don't let anyone tell you any different. Classical players can be a little "territorial" sometimes and "look down their nose" to a certain extent at other forms of legitimate music. My own teacher, before he passed away, was not impressed when I showed him a little jazz progression and also I was a little disappointed and annoyed when he talked me out of learning a piece that Earl Klugh played called The April Fools. It was a lovely classical-sounding piece and perhaps he didn't think he could teach it to me or get the music for it.

If such luminaries as John Williams can play an electric guitar professionally then it's o.k. for the rest of us I say! It doesn't mean you or I love classical any less. Conversely, guitarists from other styles have looked toward the classical guitar to refine their technique for their own style. Indeed, even the world famous Sharon Isbin writing in the Classical Guitar Answer Book said... "Many of the jazz, bluegrass, fingerstyle, and even rock professionals I've met studied classical guitar at one time in order to improve their technique. And classical players who know how to improvise can use that skill to advantage in their approaches to programming and composition."

So you see, there is often fertile "cross-pollination" between the guitar styles - and it's a good thing!

4. New Page - Concierto De Aranjuez

I've added a new page about the popular Concierto De Aranjuez. When writing the Concierto de Aranjuez, Rodrigo would never have imagined that it would become not only the most famous guitar concerto of all time, but one of the most popular concertos of all time of any instrument. All this and he didn't even play the guitar!

Read more here...

5. Recommended Resource - The Classical Guitar Evolution, Players and History

This book by Maurice J. Summerfield is a handy resource for the classical guitarist.

It details composers and players and has a wealth of interesting information. I highly recommend it. You can get it here...

6. This Month's Fr/ee Music

And now for the music! This month's music is a waltz in F major by Matteo Carcassi. You can get a copy (including Tablature) here...

Don't forget to right click and use "Save Target As" to your desktop (if you're using Windows). I hope you enjoy the music!

And that's all for this issue. See you next month :))

Back to Back Issues Page